Denver herbal pharmacy

2017 Community Herbalist Certificate Program

The Community Herbalist Program is a 500-hour herbal studies program that includes The Foundations of Western Herbal Medicine (a materia medica approach to herbal medicine by body system), medicine making and herbal field work. We will look closely at modern clinical uses of herbal remedies as well as the time-honored traditions of folk medicine and traditional healing practices. We work to unearth the essence of ‘essential herbalism’ – herbal medicine that embraces change and honors tradition!

Emphasis will be on the preparation and use of both common city weeds, easily cultivated garden herbs and wild plant medicines. We are committed to sharing and passing on the traditional teaching of wildcrafting: the skill of gathering wild plants in wild places. The importance of this cannot be overstated. It is what keeps the medicine in the hands of the people and also the treasure that transforms knowledge of herbs into the wisdom of knowing the medicines. It is an essential skill of the Community Herbalist!

Students in the Community Herbalist Program may join us for an elective 8 day wildcrafting trip.*  We will spend our days gathering plants and making medicines in the wild ‘medicine gardens’ of the Rocky Mountains and the Desert Southwest. Our trip will bring together the best teachers and wild plant people from Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. We will spend time learning from Donna Chesner, Michael Cottingham, Debra Brandt and Beverly McFarland {Shelley’s NOTE: there is no other program I know of that offers students the opportunity to be exposed to so many wild medicine plants and truly amazing teachers all on one trip. We are blessed!} I am delighted to get to co-teach with these magnificent and wise teachers. *The price of the wildcrafting trip is not included in the program cost. Cost is $500.

Dates: Initial Immersion Weekend: 4/6 & 4/7 (Thurs & Fri) 6:30-9:30pm; 4/7 & /9 (Sat & Sun) 10am-4pm

Thursday Evenings: April 6 -December 14. {Note: no class the first Thursday of the month unless enrolled in the women’s program. No Thursday class during the wildcrafting trip or the trip to Mexico.}

Medicine Making Intensive: Thursday May 18- Sunday, May 21 (10am-4pm)

Outdoor Classes: Adventures of The Apiaceae Family- Saturday June 10 (10-3), Indian Peaks High Mountain Medicines- July 15 (10-3), Garden Medicines Sunday July 16 & Sept 10 (2-4)

*Wildcrafting Trip- Saturday July 29- Sunday, August 6.

Final Immersion Weekend: 12/14 & 12/15 (Thurs & Fri) 6:30-9:30pm; 12/16 & 12/17 (Sat & Sun) 10am-4pm
 
Total Hours: 500+Hours
Cost: $5,800*
(see payment schedule on the application for specifics and discounts)

Additional expenses include: basic herb supplies & books, cost of wildcrafting trip travel and minimal lodging costs for nights we stay at hot springs, cost of special guest teachers if opportunity arises which will be optional.
All students receive a discount on tinctures, essential oils and teas.

*Note: Wildcrafting trip is not included in tuition cost.Trip cost is $500. Students in any of the programs may join the field trip based on availability. Non-refundable deposit of $300 is due upon registration and balance is due June 15, 2017)

*Also: Students in the Community Herbalist Program may join us for the Mexico Trip. Cost is $2800, and a non-refundable deposit of $400 is due upon registration. Balance is due September 15, 2017)

Please note: Initial Immersion Weekend, Medicine Making Intensive, Outdoor Classes, Final Immersion Weekend and of course the Wildcrafting Trip and the Mexico Trip will include students from both the Community Herbalist Program and The Women’s Program.

What does the Community Herbalist Program consist of?

  • Foundations of Western Herbal Medicine: Body Systems & Materia Medica Approach to Herbalism presents the ‘materia medica’ of herbal medicine, a plant specific approach to health and imbalance by body system. This teaches you the specific medicine of the plants and how to prepare and use herbal medicines. This is how I was taught. Simultaneously, you will begin putting together herbal tea and tincture formulas for each body system we study, immediately putting to use what you are learning.
  • Class includes a 4-day medicine making intensive where students will learn to make tea formulations, fresh and dry plant tincture preparations, herbal oils and salves, syrups, elixirs and more.
  • 2 Garden Medicine classes
  • Indian Peaks day-long High Mountain Medicine Making Class
  • Adventures of the Apiaceae Family day-long outdoor class– Getting to know the most powerful and most poisonous plants of the Rocky Mountains
  • Wildcrafting Trip: Colorado, Arizona, & New Mexico
  • Traditional Healing classes including Spiritual Healing with Plants, Drum Making & sweat lodge
  • Required completion of your personal Materia Medica & Herbal Formulations Reference Notebook. A beautiful and BIG project. This is one of the most important learning and reference tools you will use in your early work as an herbalist!
  • Required completion of Foundations of Western Herbal Medicine Homework & Final Presentation Projects

What is a Community Herbalist?

A Community Herbalist carries herbal wisdom teachings and traditions into the community to be of service to people and to be stewards of the earth, in the best way possible. They work with family, friends and others in the community who need a supportive and knowledgeable ally in their journey towards self-discovery, health and balance.

A Community Herbalist knows how to differentiate between issues that present an opportunity for herbal self-care, and those that require outside medical care. Students from my program will have the essential skills to head up to the hills and make medicine and the ability to sit down and share herbal information with a medical professional and in a concise manner.

Why pass on what I know?

I believe that the saying ‘you’ve got to give it away to keep it’ holds true. Within the North American herbal community, a major generational shift is occurring, and we are in a time of powerful change. Many of the great herbalists in my lineage of teachers have died. Michael Moore, Cascade Anderson Geller, and both Miss Beatrice Waight and Hortense Robinson have passed in the last several years. Now that I am in my mid-forties, it has become important for me to share what I know with the next generation of herbalists to be, honoring and continuing the teachings that have been passed on to me.

Why study with me?

Before I tell you why, I want to emphasize an important point. None of my colleagues that offer what I consider to be excellent herbal studies programs studied with just one teacher. The study of herbal medicine is a life-long pursuit. Most of us have had many primary teachers- both in the US and in other countries. As herb teachers, we have had years and years of experience working with plants and people. I’ve been doing this work for 24 years, and I feel blessed to have spent my life dedicated to this work.

Why is this important?

The teachings that you will receive from me represent a body of work that is uniquely mine, made up of years of client-centered insight, thousands of client tincture formulas and real world experience that are practical, magical and credible.


“For over 30 years, Michael Moore taught hundreds of people through his groundbreaking program at the Southwest School of Botanical Medicine.  Shelley Torgove was one of those people. I know of no other student of Michael’s who has worked harder, with more passion and integrity, to adapt and constantly expand herbal medicine into a Western clinical setting.  Her commitment to women’s reproductive and overall health issues has resulted in the creation of an invaluable and comprehensive body of knowledge in this field.   To work with Shelley is to be part of a dynamic interaction with the plant allies, steeped in respect for tradition, and infused with gratitude for the possibility of understanding and healing.”
Donna Chesner, Administrator Southwest School of Botanical Medicine